The Best of Legaltech 2017: Our Favorite Quotes from the Speakers



by David Horrigan on February 07, 2017

Community , Legal & Industry Education

Legaltech and Legalweek 2017 are in the books. As it has been for years, the conference was one of the largest in legal technology, with approximately 10,000 attendees.

As always, we covered many of the sessions, and you can find archives of our live tweet coverage here.

To give you an even quicker read and a feel for the law, technology, and humor that is Legaltech, we continue our tradition of bringing you The Best of Legaltech: Our Favorite Quotes from the Speakers.

 

ricardo-anzaldua_100x100.pngRicardo Anzaldua, Executive Vice President and General Counsel, MetLife

“Computers are going to take over certain legal tasks—the practice of law will focus more on advice.”

 

monica-bay_100x100.pngMonica Bay, Fellow, Stanford Law School CodeX

“As computational technology and artificial intelligence matures, more people will be able to have better access to justice.”

 

Erwin ChemerinskyErwin Chemerinsky, Dean, University of California-Irvine School of Law

“When I teach Katz v. United States, I’ve realized that most of my law students don’t know what a phone booth is.”

and

“I think both the Supreme Court and lawyers will be more important in the next few years than in any time in US history.”

 

Chris DaleChris Dale, Founder, eDisclosure Information Project

“If companies have hitherto lacked an ROI for information governance, the GDPR provides many reasons for knowing what data you have, and for disposing of data which either offends the Regulation or makes it harder to comply with it.”

 

John DavisJohn Davis, Executive Director and Counsel, Global e-Discovery at UBS AG

Commenting on the limits of planning: “A great American philosopher, Mike Tyson, once said, ‘Everyone has a plan until they get punched in the face.’”

 

James FrancisUS Magistrate Judge James Francis IV (S.D.N.Y.)

“It’s very good to come to an agreement on preservation—it’s also very hard to come to an agreement on preservation.”

 

Dennis GarciaDennis Garcia, Assistant General Counsel, Microsoft

“Big Law will finally start to go big in the cloud.”

 

Taylor HoffmanTaylor Hoffman, Global Head of e-Discovery Management, Swiss Re

“It doesn’t take a PhD in 20th Century history to know why data privacy is a fundamental right in the European Union.”

 

Andy JimenezAndrew Jimenez, President and CEO, FRONTEO USA

Commenting on the future of the e-discovery industry: “We’re going to be closer to becoming consultants.”

 

Daniel Martin KatzDaniel Martin Katz, Assistant Professor, Chicago-Kent College of Law

“The financialization of the law will be a dominant vector over the next decade.”

 

Elizabeth LaporteUS Magistrate Judge Elizabeth Laporte (N.D. Cal.)

“If you can agree on ESI protocols, you’ve gone a long way to avoiding trouble.”

 

Andrew McafeeAndrew McAfee, Best-selling Author of The Second Machine Age

“How does a chess Grandmaster say he can beat a computer in a chess match? Bring a hammer.”

and

“The HiPPO [Highest Paid Person’s Opinion] makes things worse 46 percent of the time.”

 

Roger MeltzerRoger Meltzer, Global Co-Chairman and Americas Co-Chairman, DLA Piper

“In order to succeed, the legal industry needs to get off the dime and embrace diversity.”

 

Mark OhringerMark Ohringer, Executive Vice President and General Counsel, Jones Lang LaSalle

Commenting on phishing attacks: “About 20 percent of people will give up credentials—if you have 70,000 employees, that's huge.”

 

Patrick OotPatrick Oot, Partner, Shook, Hardy & Bacon

“Does proportionality in e-discovery trickle down to preservation?”

 

US Magistrate Judge Andrew Peck S.D.N.Y.US Magistrate Judge Andrew Peck (S.D.N.Y.)

[Lawyers telling opposing counsel]: “Just giving me the 50 documents that are going to be my trial exhibits doesn’t work in e-discovery.”

 

US District Judge Xavier RodriguezUS District Judge Xavier Rodriguez (W.D. Tex.)

Commenting on Fulton v. Livingston Fin. LLC: “It’s kind of hard to sanction litigants for using the old Federal Rules when we judges are doing it ourselves.”

and

“Proportionality in e-discovery may be in the eye of the beholding judge.”

 

Ariana TadlerAriana Tadler, Partner, Milberg LLP, and Executive Director, Cardozo Law School Data Law Initiative

On how the proportionality debate is more complex than some may think: “Proportionality in e-discovery is about more than merely the amount in controversy.”

and

“Five is not a magical number for e-discovery custodians—it depends on the case.”

 

Paul WeinerPaul Weiner, Shareholder and National e-Discovery Counsel, Littler Mendelson

“The best thing for e-discovery would be to make all devices company-owned, but that’s unrealistic in 2017.”

 

What were your most memorable takeaways from this year’s Legaltech conference? Let us know in the comments or @kCura on Twitter.

David Horrigan is kCura’s e-discovery counsel and legal content director. An attorney, law school guest lecturer, e-discovery industry analyst, and award-winning journalist, David has served as counsel at the Entertainment Software Association, reporter and assistant editor at The National Law Journal, and analyst and counsel at 451 Research.

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